Creating Accessible Powerpoint Guidelines

Know your audience. Consider accessibility when making a presentation to help ensure that everyone can participate.  Don’t hesitate to announce at the beginning of the term if someone requires accommodation to speak with you or contact Student Services.

Guide-to-Accessible-Powerpoint Presentations

Always:

  • Speak slowly, clearly and loudly. If there is a microphone, speak into it as this will help amplify sound for members with low hearing
  • Use plain language and speak in short sentences
  • Avoid using acronyms or technical jargon
  • Direct your presentation to the audience, not the ASL interpreter. Try not to be distracted by their presence
  • Describe images; don’t assume everyone can see them
    • Poor description: the picture illustrates an accessible front entrance
    • Good description: the picture shows the front entrance to a building. Included in the picture are curb cuts, tactile walking surface indicators and power door operators, all of which improve the accessibility of the front entrance of the building
  • Repeat questions before providing an answer

Avoid:

  • Putting your hands in front of your face when speaking

 When communicating with participants after a presentation or during a break

Always:

  • Identify yourself when approaching someone and speak to them directly, not their interpreter/support person (if present)
  • Be patient; things may take a little longer. Give the person the time they need to get their point across
  • If requested by a participant with low vision to move from one place to another – offer your arm (an elbow) and walk slowly
  • Wait until you receive permission if you offer assistance

Avoid:

  • Interrupting or finishing the person’s sentences; wait for them to finish
  • Pretending to understand what’s being said; just ask again
  • Touching the person without asking permission, unless it’s an emergency
  • Making contact with the person’s service animal (if present)